How to Play

With all our games you have a chance to run your own wrestling federation in the role of the main promoter and booker. Game action is fast and furious and moves in real time. The game is easy to learn and play and still packs a realistic punch!

The focus is your imagination. All our games are played using cards, charts, and dice. Our games can also be played on your computer with COTGonline. Any of our Introductory Box Sets are the best place to start as they provide you with everything you need to play including card, dice, charts, instruction book, and handbook with game stories. These are also found at the online store.

 

The Character Cards

The key elements that make up the games are the character cards. On the front of the card, you’ll find an incredible drawing of the character. In the case below, it’s El Generico, Ole! The back of each playing card has all the game information for having a wrestling match. It features the character’s favorite moves on offense, their abilities on defense, height, weight, home, and overall ratings.

 

BASIC GAME RULES

Players using the basic game should ignore all instructions in parenthesis on wrestlers’ playing cards. The instructions in parenthesis apply only for optional rules.

1. INTRODUCTION

The game begins with each of two players deciding which wrestler they want to be in a match. The wrestler’s playing cards will be used throughout the match. Players will take turns rolling the dice and seeing what happens on their wrestler’s playing card. One player makes an offensive move, then the opponent makes a defensive move, and so on throughout a match. The object of the game is to win the match by pin, disqualification, or count out.

 

2. WRESTLERS’ PLAYING CARDS

Each wrestler’s playing card contains information about their offensive and defensive skills.

The offensive side of the card (left side) shows the wrestler’s favorite moves and unique fighting style. Most moves on offense are followed by a number. This number signals how powerful the move is. A move followed by a 1 is least powerful, while a move followed by a 3 is most powerful.

The defensive side of the card (right side) shows how a wrestler reacts when he is under attack by his opponent. The instructions describe whether a wrestler is dazed, hurt, or down. When he is dazed he is not seriously hurt, but when he is down he is at his weakest.

Most instructions, both on offense and defense, are followed by a number. This number tells the opposing player where to look on his wrestler’s playing card when he takes his turn.

The bottom of the card contains information about a wrestler’s specific skills. Only the information on the left side of the bottom of the playing card (Ropes, Turnbuckle, Ring, Deathjump, Disqualification) is needed to play the basic game.

 

3. PLAYING THE GAME

Each player begins by placing his wrestler’s playing card in front of him. Players then roll the dice to see who makes the first move in the match. Highest roll starts the match.

There are six possible moves at each of the three offensive levels. The player who starts the match rolls one die and looks for the number corresponding to the roll of the die under LEVEL 1 OFFENSE. The result will be a move followed by a number. The move is the opening move in the match. The number tells the opposing player where to look on his playing card to see how he reacts to the move. The following rule tells the opposing player where to look on his playing card.

For an offensive move followed by a 1 see your LEVEL 1 DEFENSE

For an offensive move followed by a 2 see your LEVEL 2 DEFENSE

For an offensive move followed by a 3 see your LEVEL 3 DEFENSE

The opposing player now rolls one die and checks the result on his appropriate defensive level.

One of two things can happen to a wrestler when he is on defense. Either he is stunned by his opponent’s move or he manages to fight back. A roll on defense which results in the instructions dazed, hurt, or down means that the wrestler is in trouble and his opponent makes another offensive move. These instructions will be followed by a number. This number tells the opponent at what offensive level he should roll.

On the other hand, a roll on defense that results in the wrestler’s own name in capital letters means that the wrestler counters the move and fights back. The number following the wrestler’s name tells where he should roll on offense.

A typical match goes back and forth in this manner until a wrestler is pinned, disqualified, counted out, or both are disqualified.

 

4. CHARTS

Game charts are used when a player rolls one of the following instructions on offense:

  1. into the ropes
  2. into the turnbuckle
  3. out of the ring
  4. deathjump

When these situations occur the opponent consults the appropriate chart. See the instructions on the charts for further information. For each of the four charts, RATING A is excellent, RATING B is average, and RATING C is poor.

 

5. PINS

At some time during the course of a match a player will roll PIN on his wrestler’s card. This means that the wrestler has been covered by the opponent and the match might end. When a player rolls PIN he rolls both dice to see if he loses the match. If the result of the roll is the same or lower than the number following PIN, then the wrestler is pinned and he loses the match. If the result of the roll is greater than the number following PIN, then the match goes on with the opponent rolling on LEVEL 3 OFFENSE.

 

6. FINISHERS

A wrestler’s finisher is his most powerful move and if he can execute it properly he will win his match. Moves on LEVEL 3 OFFENSE in capital letters refer to the wrestler’s finishing move. When a wrestler’s finisher is rolled, the opponent automatically rolls both dice for his PIN rating.

 

7. DISQUALIFICATIONS

Wrestlers may lose a match by disqualification, depending on how much of a rule-breaker they are. Wrestlers are disqualified for ignoring a referee’s warning (see Deathjump chart) or fighting outside the ring (see Out of the Ring chart). A wrestler’s disqualification rating is given at the bottom of his playing card. In a disqualification situation the player rolls both dice. If the result of the combined roll is the same or lower than the number following Disqualification, then the player is disqualified and loses the match. If the roll is a number higher than the number following Disqualification, then the wrestler is not disqualified and the match continues.

 

8. TAG-TEAM RULES

For tag bouts each player chooses two wrestlers prior to the start of a match. Basic rules are the same as in single matches. A wrestler can tag out to his partner at any time when he is on offense. A player may not tag out when he is on defense. His tag partner enters the ring by rolling one die on the same level of offense his partner was on.

In tag matches try not to let one wrestler dominate a match. Use reasonable judgment.

 

OPTIONAL RULES

Included in this section are rules which add realism to the game. Generally these rules allow players to make choices during the course of a match. The rules range from simple to more complicated. Any of the rules may be used in any combination. Players are advised to use their own judgment in deciding which rules to use and which not to use.

For competitive play, using all of these rules is the community standard. If you do not wish to use all of these rules in a competitive match, it’s best to discuss this with your opponent before starting.

 

1. TAKING FATIGUE INTO ACCOUNT

For this rule, players use the PIN rating in parenthesis and ignore the PIN rating used in the basic game. To take fatigue into account players should increase their PIN rating by one after each unsuccessful cover by their opponent. Tokens should be available (like pennies) to keep a running track of a player’s PIN rating.

 

2. FINISHER RATINGS

The number in parenthesis following a wrestler’s finisher is his finisher rating and tells how powerful his finishing move is. A rating of +5 is the most powerful while a rating of zero is least powerful.

When a player rolls his finisher on offense, the opponent rolls both dice, adding the finisher rating to his PIN rating. If the result of the combined roll is the same or lower than the adjusted PIN rating, then he loses the match. If the result of the roll is greater than the adjusted PIN rating, the match continues in the usual manner. This rule should be used together with rule #1.

 

3. TAGGING OUT ON DEFENSE

When a player rolls an instruction on defense followed by (tag), then the player has the option of trying to tag out to his partner. This rule only applies when the two wrestlers are regular tag partners or members of the same group. If the members of a tag team are not regular tag partners or members of the same group, then the (tag) instruction should be ignored.

When (tag) is rolled and a player wishes to tag out to his ally, he must roll both dice. If the two wrestlers are tag partners, then a roll of 6 or less (with two dice) means the tag is successful. The partner enters on LEVEL 1 OFFENSE. If the two wrestlers are members of the same group, then a roll of 4 or less means the tag is successful.

 

4. AGILITY AND POWER RATINGS

This rule applies for offensive moves followed by (ag) or (pw). A wrestler’s agility (ag) refers to his quickness and mobility. A wrestler’s power (pw) refers to his brute strength. The ratings for these abilities are shown at the bottom of the wrestler’s playing card. A rating of -5 is excellent, while a rating of +5 is poor. A rating of zero is average.

A move followed by (ag) or (pw) is successful only if the wrestler on offense has an agility or power rating that is the same or better than the opponent. If the opponent has a better agility or power rating, then the opponent counters the move and rolls on Level 2 Offense.

 

5. BASIC CHART CHOICES

This rule applies when the instructions into the ropes, into the turnbuckle, out of the ring, or deathjump are followed by a (c). This means that the player has a choice to try the move or roll again. If the player decides to go ahead wih the move, then the opponent checks the proper chart and rolls to see what happens. If the player decides not to try the move, then he rolls again at the next lowest offensive level (i.e. if a player decides not to attempt out of the ring (c) on Level 3 Offense, he can reroll on Level 2 Offense).

 

6. LEAVING THE RING

The rule applies when a player rolls the instruction down – 3 on LEVEL 3 DEFENSE followed by (lv). This means that the player has the option of leaving the ring. If the player decides to leave, then he checks his Ring rating, rolls both dice, and checks the result on the Out of the Ring chart. If the player decides to leave, then he checks his Ring rating, rolls both dice, and checks the result on the Out of the Ring chart. If the player decides to stay in the ring the game is played in the usual manner with the opponent rolling on LEVEL 3 OFFENSE.

In tag matches, the player may have a choice between trying to tag out to his partner (tag) or leaving the ring (lv). A player may try either move, but not both.

 

7. THE CHOICE SITUATIONS CHART

This rule applies when an instruction on offense is followed by (ch) and a letter. The original instruction should be ignored. Instead, the player looks at the Choice Situations chart under the letter that followes (ch) on the playing card. In all cases a player has a choice of two moves to try on his opponent. Whether the moves will be successful or not depends on the certain skills on the opponent. The offensive player will need to add or subtract his opponent’s agility and/or power ratings to determine the odds that these moves will be successful. See the Choice Situations chart for further information.

 

8. THE FEUD TABLE

The Feud Table is used when a feud match (refer to the last page of the wrestler’s description booklet) ends with a roll of doubles (including pins, disqualifications, double disqualifications, and count outs). When this happens, there will be fighting after the match is over. Often this fighting will involve other wrestlers and someone will be injured. See the Feud Table for further instructions.

A wrestler may be injured in these feud situations. The instructions will indicate the number of fight cards the wrestler will be injured. A wrestler may still fight when he is injured, but his PIN rating increases by two at the start of a match. For example, if a wrestler’s PIN rating is usually 5, it becomes 7 when he is injured.

 

9. RINGSIDE ALLY

A wrestler may choose to have an ally accompany him to ringside in single bouts. This ally might become involved in the match. Bringing an ally to ringside increases the risk of disqualification, but can pay off in a victory as well.

When a player is thrown out of the ring and the opponent’s ally is at ringside, the ally has the option to interfere in the match. If the opponent’s ally chooses to interfere, the Out of the Ring chart changes in the following way: Rolls of 6 or lower for RATINGS A, B, and C will mean that the ally interferes in the match. The new instructions read as follows:

You are attacked outside the ring by the opponent’s ally. The ally smashes you into a steel post. The opponent and ally may be disqualified. OPPONENT ROLLS DISQUALIFICATION 6. If there is no disqualification, then the ally tosses you back into the ring to the waiting hands of the opponent. OPPONENT ROLLS ON LEVEL 3 OFFENSE.

All disqualification in these situations occur on rolls o 6 or lower, regardless of the disqualification rating on the wrestler’s playing card.

 

10. ADD 1 MOVES

Some moves on wrestler cards are followed by “Add 1.” These are powerful moves that might not involved a pin. In these situations, add one to the opponent’s Pin Rating and continue playing in the normal manner.

 

11. ROLL FINISHERS

Some wrestlers have a “roll” finisher that requires the player to roll one or two dice, for example a finishing move followed by (roll) or (2-6) or some other variation. The roll is the finisher rating. Sometimes a roll of 1 or 6 means the wrestler misses the move (different wrestlers have different variations on the roll finisher – see individual wrestler cards for specifics).

 

12. OFFENSIVE TAG MOVES

A move on offense followed by (tag) means the move only works when the wrestler is involved in a tag-team match. In singles matches roll again at the same level of offense until you roll a different instruction. A move on offense followed by (singles) means the move only works in singles matches. In tag matches roll again at the same level of offense until you roll a different instruction.

 

13. DISQUALIFICATION MOVES

Any move followed by (dq) means the wrestler could be disqualified for using the move. Roll the wrestler’s disqualification rating (or the number in parenthesis with the (dq) instruction, if present) to see if he is diqualified.

 

14. RINGSIDE DISTRACTIONS

A manager, valet, or wrestler may attempt to distract the referee during a match. Look at the Distractor Rating on the playing card. If the Distractor Rating is 6, this means the distraction works on rolls of 2-6 (using two dice). If the roll is 7-12, the distraction is unsuccessful and the match continues in the normal manner. If a distraction is used to avoid a pin, the manager (or whoever) must try to distract the referee prior to the roll of the pin. If the distraction is successful, the pin does not have to be rolled. Add one to the wrestler’s Pin Rating for fatigue. The wrestler on offense rolls again on Level 3 Offense. Any wrestler may appear at ringside for a match and his/her Distractor Rating is automatically 5 (even if there is no Distractor Rating on his/her card). Distractions may be tried one time per match and outside interference may be tried one time per match. See the outside interference charts for the outcomes.